OSDI '08: FlightPath: Obedience vs. Choice in Cooperative Services

This is one of my favourite papers from OSDI ’08 (yes, still doing a few reviews, trying to get to five or so before SOSP…). FlightPath is a system developed by some folks mainly at UT Austin for peer-to-peer streaming in dynamic networks. This is a reasonably challenging problem in itself, although one that’s seen a good deal of work before. However, the really cool thing about this paper is that they treat participants in the network as potentially rational agents. Since Lamport’s seminal work on the Byzantine generals problem, it’s been standard practice to assign one of two behaviour modes to members of distributed systems: either you’re alturistic, which means that you do exactly what the protocol tells you to do, no matter what the cost to yourself, or Byzantine, which means that you do whatever you like, again no matter what the cost to yourself.

It was realised recently that this is a false dichotomy: there’s a whole class of behaviour that’s not captured by these two extremes. Rational agents participate in a protocol as long as it is worth their while to do so. At its most simple, this means that rational agents will not incur a cost unless they expect to recoup a benefit that is worth equal to or more than the original cost to them. This gave rise to the Byzantine-Alturistic-Rational (BAR) model, due to the same UTA group, which can be used to more realistically model the performance of peer-to-peer protocols.
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OSDI '08: Corey, an operating system for many cores

Just before Christmas, the systems community held one of its premier conferences – Operating Systems Design and Implementation (OSDI ’08). This biannual conference showcases some of the best research in operating systems, networks, distributed systems and software technology from the past couple of years.

Although I wasn’t lucky enough to go, I did grab a copy of the proceedings and had a read through a bunch of the papers that interested me. I plan to post summaries of a few to this blog. I see people ask repeatedly on various forums (fora?) “what’s new in computer science?”. No-one seems to give a satisfactory answer, for a number of reasons. Hopefully I can redress some of the balance here, at least in the systems world.

Without further ado, I’ll get stuck in to one of the OSDI papers: Corey: an operating system for many cores by Boyd-Wickizer et al from a combination of MIT, Fudan University, MSR Asia and Xi’an Jiaotong University (12 authors!). Download the paper and play along at home, as usual.
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